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FAQ and Forms

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FAQ

 

Q. Water is coming through my wall? Or…There is white residue on my wall, why?
A. Efflorescence and drainage.drainage-1

A common problem Greencare encounters in Las Vegas and surrounding areas is water coming through walls and draining from one home to another. On several homes the lots are actually designed this way. Water is going to find the easiest route to get to the lowest elevation. When the builder first started to grade out the land for your development they had to build homes on flat surfaces and steer the water to the lowest point into the eventual storm drain if a heavy rain hit. Most of the water will end up draining into the ground before it gets to the storm drain. In some instances the ground will appear damp for weeks if not months and may never completely dry out if shaded. The goal in drainage planning is to steer the water away from the foundation of your home and sometimes that means from one lot elevation to another lot elevation that is lower.

The desert soil in Las Vegas does not drain well in most areas. This is why if you have a drip system in your yard and you are watering regularly there will be areas that potentially always remain damp. The rock may look spotty and damp even in areas that are far away from plants. This does not necessarily mean there is a leak. Decorative rock will also draw water into the rock itself from the ground and sometimes appear damp and spotty even long after the watering timer has stopped. If watering times are set every day or even a few times per week it may never completely dry out. The rock Greencare installed here was laid down over the natural drainage path of the yard and Greencare installed real grass so the rock will often look spotty long after watering. Grass is not native to the Nevada desert so you have to water abundantly and the ground doesn’t drain well so this is what happens. You have to take the good with the bad. Some rocks are more porous than others so some will absorb more water and look damp, it is normal.

wall

The wall seen on the left has a bad case of efflorescence. The white minerals leaching from the mortar have seriously stained both the stone and the mortar.

The first thing to realize is that these mineral deposits are just an aesthetic problem. They do not compromise the structural integrity of any of the masonry in and about your new home. The white powder you see is efflorescence. The brick, stone, concrete block, mortar etc. contain water soluble salts that are the source of the white deposits. Soil behind retaining walls can also contain these same salts.

These trapped salts are set into motion when water enters masonry. The water dissolves the salts and carries them through the masonry towards the surface. Sunlight and wind draw the water to the surface but as the water evaporates, the salts are left behind.

The salts contained in the brick, mortar, stone, concrete block eventually exhaust themselves and the white mineral deposits simply go away. But salts within soil can persist for decades. Each time you try to wash the wall surfaces to remove the salts, you actually compound the problem. The water you use simply soaks into the masonry surfaces and dissolves the salts to create more problems days later. The surfaces typically look fantastic when wet, but the white powder appears again when the surfaces dry.

To stop the efflorescence you must stop all water from entering the masonry so if plants need water to survive you are in a catch 22. Either no plants or deal with the white residue. Efflorescence is very common on new brick and stonework.

concerns

When a retaining wall is built then is sealed and is backfilled with dirt even though it was treated with a waterproofing compound you will see water on the other side. There are a few reasons for this: If the house on the other side is at a lower grade the water will come through below the ground level of the higher elevation home, which we can’t stop because we can’t seal below the ground. Water flows downward and once it is below ground level the wall on the lower side will draw the water in and therefore you get the water coming through and the residue on the lower side. Even if the homes are at the same level, at times the water will still come through because CMU blocks will actually draw the water upwards due to the fact they are so porous.

The only way to stop this would have been to seal the entire wall below the ground level when constructed. Sealing walls for future possible water is not common practice with builders. The builder should have done this when the wall was being constructed. It would have taken some time but would have helped stop the water and the efflorescence.

But that’s not normally the case so here we are. Efflorescence happens. It is part of building new things. It eventually goes away after deposits are exhausted, but this process can take years. When possible, it is best to just let the problem diminish on its own.

Stopping water from entering masonry is the best way to make efflorescence stop. But it is not as easy as one might think. Water can enter masonry and travel up, down and sideways! You can actually get efflorescence on masonry walls caused by moisture in the soil that wicks up a wall.

White Efflorescence Stains on Retaining Walls


Efflorescence happens naturally as concrete cures.

“I built a retaining wall out of stackable blocks last year, and they are turning white and chalky-looking. When I wet them down, the blocks look great, but when they dry out they look white again. I don’t like what I’m seeing – can you help?”
Those powdery white stains on your blocks are likely caused by efflorescence. As concrete cures, the moisture slowly migrates to the surface of the block where it evaporates into the air. Like a candle wick, the water brings dissolved salts and minerals from within the concrete mixture. As the water evaporates, those minerals are left on the surface of your block, giving it a whitish, hazy or streaky stain.
In most cases, this problem is temporary – eventually the salts will all be removed from the concrete, and the efflorescence will stop. How long this takes depends on the ingredients with which the concrete was made, and how long it takes for the concrete to cure and dry out completely.
However, with landscape retaining walls, your blocks are constantly being exposed to ground water and hydrostatic pressure, which can force moisture (and more salts from the soil) into the blocks to later show up as efflorescence.


Efflorescence on wall at joints in the underground drainage channel.
    Here are some tips for dealing with efflorescence:

  • Efflorescence is ugly, but it does not affect the strength or functioning of the block.
  • Normal efflorescence should stop once the concrete is completely cured. Ongoing streaky stains or cakey buildup, particularly at joints and cracks, may indicate a problem with water infiltration and drainage.
  • It’s important to reduce the amount of moisture that is getting into your wall. Mortared walls should be treated on both sides with a waterproofing sealer. Non-mortared, stackable retaining walls should be backfilled with gravel, with water drainage directed off to the sides. This prevents water pressure from building up in the soil behind the wall (and forcing itself into the concrete blocks).
  • Avoid pressure-washing or overly wetting your blocks. This makes them look nice at the time, but it forces water into the concrete, inviting more efflorescence.
  • Clean off light stains with a dry, stiff brush, then remove the dust with a damp sponge. If you have heavy stains, try scrubbing with white vinegar. Stubborn stains can be removed with a masonry cleaning solution.
  • Asphalt Damage Facts & Disclaimer.

    A loader & excavators are needed for digging a pool and delivering material to your job site and underground or heavy dirt movement work. It is common to have immediate damage to asphalt just by driving the machinery on it. In a short time especially through one summer it becomes nearly invisible when the job is done. Machines that are designed to dig there wheels in for traction with no slippage are used.

    When we are finished with the project and clean up at the end of the project and summer hits the temperature will be around 102 to 115 on any given day. All asphalt will be extremely soft near the point of melting. It will smooth out naturally from traffic and become hardly noticeably, it is designed to do so. To patch asphalt on public streets a major overhaul is not req. If cuts are not greater than 2″ a repair is not normally needed. It does not affect the integrity of the street. It is an esthetic fix that will become nearly invisible with a little time. Public roads are continually repaired on local city standard maintenance schedules. If extensive damage is apparent it is repaired by stripping to a depth slightly more than the depth of existing damage to the asphalt or equal to the existing asphalt section depth. Only if asphalt is so damaged that the gravel or the type 2 is visible would we recommend damaged asphalt be removed and redone. Standard asphalt is strong enough to sustain structural integrity far greater than the weight of equipment used for digging a pool or deliveries on a truck. Its section depth and type 2 or base compaction can handle all heavy equip used. The damage that occurs is superficial and although looks bad it’s normal. The sun and the weight of vehicular traffic usually fix the problem quickly and with standard street cleaner schedules it cleans up nicely.

    We need to be clear because marks from turning equipment and minor damage and imperfections in the asphalt will still be visible after job is complete. Pool digging and landscape installation is a process that requires heavy equipment and it needs to be driven on streets as well as over sidewalks. The tires will leave black marks but they will fade and be hardly noticeable over time.

Frequently asked questions and some information we urge you to read through if you are getting ready to have landscape done.

The number one culprit for dead or dying plant material is improper watering. To prevent this, get to know your soil type and learn the proper amount of watering time required to achieve optimum soil moisture depths.

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SOD

If Outside Temperature is:
50-70 Degrees-Water every other day for 10-15 minutes
70-80 Degrees-Water once a day for 10-15 minutes
80-100 Degrees-Water twice a day for 10-15 minutes

Optimum soil moisture depths for sod are 6″ to 8″ below surface.

The first four weeks after installation is a critical period for new sod or seeded lawns. It is very important to keep it moist at all times. Be sure to schedule the final watering no later than one hour before sunset. Leaving lawns wet overnight promotes fungal diseases.

DRIP SYSTEM
Depending on the time of year plants and trees are usually set for 3 times a day 6 to 20 minutes per time.

Optimum soil moisture depths for small to medium shrubs is 12″ TO 18″
Optimum soil moisture depths for large shrubs to trees are 18″ to 36″
WATER FROM 9AM TO 4PM. DEPENDING ON THE TIME OF THE YEAR EARLIER OR LATER TIMES CAN BE SET AT THE PEAK MONTHS OF THE SUMMER.

The amount of watering time depends on the type of soil in your landscape. Be sure to use proper cycle & soaking methods especially in areas with high runoff potential. Like on sloped areas on the back side of many yards.

Watering less than 3 times per week during the first four weeks after installation can result in distress and drying out of root ball or root zone of your plant material. The amount of watering per day should rarely be adjusted as it is your goal to reach optimum soil moisture depths. Changes to your watering schedule after the initial installation period should reflect the current season, temperatures, and the type of plant material in your landscape.

If outside temperatures are above 95 degrees, schedule your drip system as late in the morning as possible for maximum soil moisture in the hot afternoon hours. Take a look at the Southern Nevada Water Authority website for further details that may affect your watering schedule.

“If your landscape area has steep slopes or heavy clay soils, it is especially important to implement proper cycle & soaking schedules. To find the proper schedule, simply divide your total watering time into 2 to 4 start times. Start times should be scheduled within 1 to 2 hours of each other. This pushes the previous watering deeper to achieve your optimum soil moisture depth.

To learn more about proper irrigation for the Las Vegas valley, check out the Southern Nevada Water Authority website or attend one of the many free workshops offered by The Desert Demonstration Gardens or The Cooperative Extension Service.

Fertilizing
* Please note that fertilizing in summer months is likely to cause plants to burn. We recommend fertilizing in the spring & fall months for the best results. Be sure to spread fertilizer around root ball

PALM TREES (Bare Root)

” It is important to leave your bare root palm trees tied for a minimum of six weeks during summer months. If trees are planted between October and March, they should remain tied until April. It is normal to see tied fronds brown-out. As long as the center heart stays green your tree will recover.

Specialty palm fertilizer is recommended during the months of April to September. Fertilizing in the winter months is not recommended as it promotes new growth that can be damaged by the cold.

Plants

” When installed, plants will have the necessary vitamins, minerals and amendments to promote healthy growth and will be planted at ground level. If a drip line is installed we will double check to make sure that each plant is receiving the right amount of water. This will not only save water, it will also prevent water damage to concrete, walls surrounding structures. This system is ideal for plants, flowers, and garden areas.

” Proper tree development is vital during the first 3 to 5 years to produce a well developed mature tree. Be sure that your gardener or tree service professional is executing proper tree care. No more than 25 % of the tree canopy should be removed within a 1 year period. Trees should be “off the stakes” 2 years after planting & proper pruning techniques should always be utilized. All major tree pruning should be performed during the late fall and winter months. Spring pruning can be extremely harmful to trees. Sap starts to flow heavily in the spring creating opportunity for the slipping of bark and is an open invitation for pests and disease.

Installed plants come with a 90 day Limited Warranty and all irrigation workmanship is guaranteed for one year.

Irrigation

” Lawn irrigation – As your lawn matures, the grade will rise. To aide in this process, we use strong Schedule 40 pipe & adjustable lawn head risers. These materials make it easier for you to re-adjust any lawn heads without having to cut into the system. We use Hunter, or Rainbird pop-up lawn heads and all trenching for irrigation systems are the proper depth with the sprinkler heads even with the ground. You can rest assured the pressure vacuum breaker (PVB) valve will be up to code on mainline sprinklers.

” Drip irrigation – We use Y filters to prevent micro particles from clogging emitters and we use pressure regulators to reduce the chance of emitters popping off due to pressure changes in the water supply. Top quality “?” poly drip lines are buried below grade to prevent surface damage caused by rock mulch and foot traffic. Pressure compensating emitters are used with the gallons per hour rating best suited for the plant materials.

All installed plumbing comes with a one year Limited Warranty.

Soil

” We use 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches minimum of top quality lawn mix. This amount of soil will save you from having to water as much and gives you better drainage for root growth. The deeper the roots grow the less water you need.

Plant materials are provided with 15 to 30 % blend of organic mulch to promote a healthy soil environment for your new plants and trees. Organic matter improves the moisture retaining capacity of soils by as much as 500%. Non organic mulches are used when planting cacti and succulents. Their native environment is very low in organic matter and use of organic mulches with cactus promotes decay and imminent death.

Sod

” When it comes to evergreen sod selections in the Las Vegas valley, tall fescue sod is preferred. It is drought and heat tolerant. Hybrid Bermudas are also available in seed or sod. Bermuda grass is more water efficient than fescue, but it is invasive and may spread into your other landscape areas. Bermuda grass goes dormant in the winter, which you can over-seed with rye to keep green.

The Sago Palm has become a very popular landscape item and is the most common cycad used in landscape today. But most people don’t realize that it is not a palm at all. Rather this plant is a Cycad, a totally different type of plant. There are over 200 different types of cycads. Cycads are a group of plants that are very primitive in their origins.

Fossils have been found on almost every continent on the planet.

It is often stated that cycads have evolved little since the days of the dinosaurs. There are species that have gone extinct, while there are others that seemed to show little evolution over millions of years. Therefore as a group, cycads are often referred to as “living fossils”. The scientific name for the Sago Palm is Cycas revoluta.

*Cycas* refers to the genus, the genus refers to a particular group of similar plants *in* the Cycad family and *revoluta* further describes the exact species of the group *Cycas*. The latter was given to this species because of the revolute (to curl back) nature of the leaflets; the edges roll under the leaflet. Many people misspell the name of this cycad as Cycas revoluta or Cica revoluta. The genus is “*Cycas*”.

The natural course of leaves on plants, including palms and cycads, is first green, then turning yellow, and finally brown and dry.

The yellow stage is where the frond is losing its chlorophyll as it is being re-absorbed into the plant. The final brown stage is the completion of the nutrients re-absorption process.

If you cut off sago fronds too soon, you are actually depriving your sago palm of its natural technique to conserve nutrients. Best is to wait until a frond is totally brown.

The exception to not being worried about yellow or brown fronds on your sago palm is if they are occurring in the center “new growth” area.

If new fronds soon turn yellow and head for brown, you have a nutrition problem. You are not feeding properly. Sometimes a sago may take a year or two or more to develop the “quick yellowing” symptom. Don’t let that fool you. Food is the answer

Once your sago palm is well established in its new location usually after one full calendar year it will start to thrive. Sago palms are fairly hardy plants. If the leaves do totally turn brown, trim them off……and wait. You’ll probably get a new batch of leaves next spring.

One rare issue to look for is on the underside of the foliage look for small white specks. A major problem of sagos is the invasive Asiatic Cycad Scale. They can cover the undersides in a few moths sucking the life out of the plant. For treatment, if you find this pest, is to spray the undersides with Organocide after it cools down to day time temperatures in the low 80′s. Or you could try using a systemic, such as Acephate (Ortho Systemic Spray) or Bayer Systemic Rose & Flower Care which has Disyston.

Q: There are lines in my Synthetic Turf? Is it defective?
A: This synthetic grass issue is caused by the sun and the reflection off of windows (sometimes yours, sometimes your neighbors), it is not under warranty due to the fact we cannot control the placements of windows or where the suns reflection hits the ground? The Low E windows are reflecting the sun back on to the ground and acting like a magnifying glass. The reason the melting takes place in lines is because that is how a reflection off of the window hits the ground (in a line about the length of the window) it may not burn the full length though due more heat generated in certain spots.
The reason the line movement goes across the grass in different locations is because the sun placement moves in the sky. As the days go by and the seasons change the sun moves from directly above at the peak of summer, toward the south then back toward the north as seasons pass each year. The reason it doesn’t burn everywhere and only certain random spots is due to hotter and more intense heat on some days. Also cloud cover on some days and not on others.
You need to first identify the window and place a cover shade over it.
Once the window is covered we can come out and either patch the grass (which it may not match perfectly or have very apparent seams) or redo the whole thing at a 20% discount from current market price. You can also choose to remove grass and do something else in that spot. Real grass does not burn. We do apologize but we cannot foresee this potential issue. It is an unfortunate yet unforeseeable problem that does happen from time to time.
Let us know when the window has been identified or if you choose to change out the synthetic turf and which route you choose.Note: Sometimes if there is left over scraps it is a good idea to keep the extra pieces just in case this rare occurrence takes place, it will be a much better match if it’s possible to patch (sometimes it’s not possible).
You will still see the edges of the patch work. It won’t look as bad if same dye pattern. We can most likely do the patch if you have the leftover pieces. We can also do the patch with a new piece but it will not match. If putting Synthetic back down? You need to get solar covers and they come in several different colors. If you just look up a solar screen company on Google they can usually come in and put those in for you.
Just let us know when complete and we will get a work order in to patch grass once screens are on. Or give you a quote to replace all of it. We can do something besides synthetic in that location as well. We are usually about 1 to 2 weeks out so let us know as soon as possible. We will evaluate what needs to be done and give you the best quote we can.

Q: What are safe and poisonous garden plants?
Click here to access this information.

 

VALVE INSTALLATION AND DETAIL

 

For proper watering schedule please click the link below. For the first 30 days we set your timer to water everyday. This is needed for the plants to get acclimated. After 30 days you will need to change your timer to your area watering schedule.

https://www.snwa.com/assets/pdf/restrictions_map.pdf

Also click link below for printable PDF instructions on how to set your timer. You are responsible for setting and changing your own timer. It needs to be adjusted Sept. 1, March 1 and May 1 Here’s how: (CLICK BELOW)

http://www.lvvwd.com/assets/pdf/drought_mandatory_water_restrictions.pdf

 

U:TIM 2016DRAINAGE EXAMPLE PLAN REVISED.fdwg FAX VERT. (1)

Drainage Facts

Natural grading (with the dirt, natural rock and gravel material only) of your property when done properly is the best way to divert water away from your home and walls then out toward the street.

This is done by pitch of grade only and water being diverted properly. This is why builders leave backyards that are sloped away from walls and your home creating a V like area in the center (seen above) of your yard that leads out toward the front on most homes.

When you are installing a pool and landscaping drainage pipes are to be used only when the path of the water is blocked by an obstruction (pavers, concrete, synthetic turf etc…). If obstructed the water needs to be diverted through a drainage pipe or deck drain (on pools) and directed passed the obstruction only leading back to the V depression in the dirt.

When decorative rock is installed you should not flatten out your landscape. Install the decorative rock on top of the grading left by builder and leave the grading pitched away from your home, walls and leading to the front with the V shape depression. The water will build up in this V shaped depression and slowly flow through the decorative rock out to the front.

When there is excessive rain there will be some build up in the areas where the water is accumulating in the V shape depression and these areas will become soft so if you walk on them you may sink in. This is normal so don’t walk in these areas until they dry out a bit. The majority of the time most of the water will drain into the ground returning to the water table which is the goal. During an intense downpour it will flow in this V depression out through the decorative rock and through a drainage brick (brick with gaps for water) left by builder in the center of your wall or can simply drain through a gate entry.

Some advantages of hiring a company with vast experience in landscaping and pool construction all on one team.

Q: How close can I install my pool to an existing tree?

A: Trees basically look the same under the ground as they do above ground; imagine turning the tree upside down and placing all of the leaves and branches underground. Well that’s about the size and what the root system looks like as a general rule of thumb, try to stay outside of the drip line of the tree if possible…but this rule is not set in stone. If space is tight and you really want to save a tree, stay at least fifteen feet from the base (see below for how to protect the tree). If trimming substantial branches is necessary, you will likely want to consult with a local tree expert, oh wait we have one at Greencare.net so just ask us

Q: Which trees should I keep and which should I remove when building a pool?

A: It depends on what you’re trying to achieve. If you want as little maintenance as possible, the first impulse is to remove as many trees as you can. But keep in mind all trees are different. Pay attention to how much debris, and what type of debris each tree produces. Fruit and nut bearing trees are an obvious no-no. Other types of trees will mostly drop debris after a storm or in the fall season.
If you want more sun or shade, you’ll need to pay attention to how the sun tracks across the sky and how each tree impacts the space. Remember that the sun takes an entirely different path in the winter VS the summer. Direct sunlight on the pool makes a tremendous difference with regards to water temperature. If you’re pool will not get direct sun for the majority of the day, you may want to consider getting a pool heater.
How can I protect my trees during construction?
If you want to protect a tree, a best practice is to place a temporary plastic fence around the base of the tree as far out as possible. This will prevent equipment from striking the trunk as well as prevent the ground around the base of the tree from becoming compacted, which would severely hinder the tree’s root system. If the soil around the base of a tree does get compacted, an air spade can loosen and aerate the soil without damaging the root system.

Q: Is it okay to build up dirt around the base of a tree?

A: Many times in a yard with a slope, the pool is installed and dirt is built up on the downhill side. If this dirt is built up on the base of a tree it will eventually cause “root rot” and kill the tree within three to five years. Slightly exposed tree roots at the surface actually help the tree breath properly. One of the worst things you can do is bury or plant a tree to deep.
Should I be concerned about tree roots damaging my pool or patio in the future?
With regards to concrete pools there is not normally a risk of damage from tree roots. With regards to the patio, it typically takes at least 10 years of growth before a root system can have any impact on a hardscape. As a rule of thumb, try to stay at least six feet away from the trunk with the patio, and if you need to encroach more than you’d like, use concrete pavers as opposed to concrete as they can be removed and re-set after the roots are trimmed (although the roots will likely come back).

Q: What should I do with the stumps after trees are removed?

A: If tree stumps are located within the footprint of the pool or patio they need to be removed. Otherwise, they will eventually decay and leave a tremendous void. A tree with an 18″ diameter stump has a root ball half the size of a VW bug, so it’s important to get it out of there. We will leave three feet of the stump above ground and coordinate removal at the time of the dig to remove and dispose of the stumps. This is time consuming and hazardous so it will cost extra, but it needs to be done.
If the stumps are located outside of the pool/patio area they can be ground down with a stump grinder done by a specialist. If you do not designate which stumps to grind, the tree guy is likely to grind them all, which makes the job of pulling the stumps even more difficult at the time of the pool excavation.

Q: Can I come back and remove trees after the pool is installed?

A: Yes, you can always come back and remove a tree after the fact, but it will likely be much more expensive as whoever is doing it will have to work around the pool.

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