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Palm Tree Selecions

Palm Tree

Bismark Palm – Bismarckia nobilis

 

This is sometimes difficult to find and can add more cost if it needs to be shipped in. An interesting large scale palm with huge blue-green, waxy, fan-shaped fronds. Good as a striking specimen or cluster in large spaces. Not suggested for small yards. Does not transplant very easily so try to plant from containers. Only moderately salt tolerant. Somewhat cold sensitive in our area.

An interesting large scale palm with huge blue-green, waxy, fan-shaped fronds. Good as a striking specimen or cluster in large spaces. Not suggested for small yards. Does not transplant very easily so try to plant from containers. Only moderately salt tolerant. Somewhat cold sensitive in our area.

Width Range 18–22 Feet
Height Range 45–55 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 20 °F
Native Location Madagascar
Canopy Value 236 ft²
Design Style Thorns/Spines
Flower Color Yellow, White
Flower Season Spring
Fruit Color Brown, Black
Fruit Season Summer

 

18–22 Feet
45–55 Feet
20 °F
Native Location Madagascar
Canopy Value 236 ft²
Design Style Thorns/Spines
Flower Color Yellow, White
Flower Season Spring
Fruit Color Brown, Black
Fruit Season Summer
General Foliage Color Green, Blue
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Medium
PH Preference Acidic, Alkaline/Basic, Neutral, Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun

 

cali_fanCalifornia Fan Palm – Not suggested for small landscape spaces, very large palm. Same fan-shaped leaves as W. robusta (Mexican Fan Palm), but with a thicker trunk. If desired, remove fronds only after they have turned brown. Remove flower stalks before seeds set to prevent reseeding in the landscape. May be susceptible to Budrot (Penicillium vermoeseni) fungus. Spray bordeauz as a preventative to control. Subject to lightning injury.

 

Width Range 10–15 Feet
Height Range 30–60 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 18 °F
Native Location Native to desert springs of Nevada, Arizona and California
Canopy Value 133 ft²
Design Style Pool Friendly, Thorns/Spines
Flower Color White
Flower Season Summer
Fruit Color Blue, Black
Fruit Season Summer, Autumn
General Foliage Color Grey, Green
Growth Rate Medium
Maintenance Level Medium
PH Preference Neutral
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Sand, Clay, Loam, Rocky, Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full
Sunset Zones 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30
USDA Hardiness Zone 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
Water Requirement Medium

 

 

 

Canary Island Date Palm,

Palm Tree

These can be put in as small as 5 gallon size which would be a couple feet tall all the way from 10 to 20 feet tall. Putting them in this large requires semi-truck transport, a hole the size of a small pool and a large crane to set them in the hole. The cost is a minimum of $7500.00 per tree to plant mature canary’s. They are a large slow growing palm with feather-shaped fronds. May form multiple trunks when young, but most often seen in single trunk form. The fronds are gray-green to blue-green with sharp spines at the base. Both male and female plants produce brush-like stalks of white to cream flowers. Females produce orange-brown fruits. Only remove fronds that hang below three o’clock and nine o’clock. Best planted in spring or summer. Susceptible to bud rot and heart rot. Can sustain cold damage during the harsher winters and is slow to recover. Spray irrigation damages the trunk.

 

Width Range 20 Feet
Height Range 40–60 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 20 °F
Native Location Egypt, Iran, Pakistan (North Africa and Middle East; Persian Gulf Countries)
Canopy Value 236 ft²
Design Style Thorns/Spines
Flower Color White
Flower Season Spring, Summer
Fruit Color Orange, Brown
Fruit Season Autumn
General Foliage Color Blue, Grey, Green
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Medium
PH Preference Neutral, Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun, Reflected Heat
Sunset Zones 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
USDA Hardiness Zone 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
Water Requirement Medium

Mediterranean Fan Palm

Chamaerops humilis

A multi-stemmed hardy palm with fan shaped fronds. Frond color varies from plant to plant, ranging between green, gray-green, blue-green and yellow-green. Frond stems are lined with sharp teeth. Tan to yellow-green flowers are not ornamental. Clusters of orange to red-brown fruits hang down from the top of the trunk. The trunk is covered in brown fuzzy ‘hair’. Do not overwater. Fertilize with palm food containing all the minor nutrients in May, June, July and August. Cut old fronds only when they turn yellow or brown. Give adequate space to spread out. Can be grown in containers and large planters. Good as a specimen or barrier plant.

 

Width Range 14–16 Feet
Height Range 14–16 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 10 °F
Native Location Western Mediterranean
Canopy Value 133 ft²
Design Style Thorns/Spines
Flower Color Green, Yellow, White
Flower Season Spring, Winter
Fruit Color Brown, Red, Orange
Fruit Season Spring
General Foliage Color Blue, Yellow, Grey, Green
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Medium, Low
PH Preference Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun, Reflected Heat
Sunset Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1, H2
USDA Hardiness Zone 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
Water Requirement Medium

Mexican Blue Palm, Blue Hesper Palm

Palm Tree

Attractive palm with pale blue-green to blue-gray, fan-shaped fronds. Takes heat and wind, doesn’t like to be overwatered. Puts out flower stalks in the spring as long as 15′ which can be cut with lopping shears if you find them undesirable. Very drought tolerant. Fronds have re-curved spines along the stem that are sharp. Fertilize in the hot months, May, June, July, August with a palm food that has all the minor nutrients.Brahea armata

 

Width Range 14–16 Feet
Height Range 25–35 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 18 °F
Native Location Northwestern Mexico, Baja California
Canopy Value 133 ft²
Design Style Rabbit Resistant, Pool Friendly, Thorns/Spines
Flower Color Yellow, White
Flower Season Spring
Fruit Color Brown, Black
Fruit Season Spring
General Foliage Color Blue, Grey, Green
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Low
PH Preference Alkaline/Basic, Neutral, Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Loam, Rocky, Well Drained, Moist
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun
Sunset Zones 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1
USDA Hardiness Zone 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
Water Requirement Medium, Low

Mexican Fan Palm

Palm Tree

Narrow trunk. Fan-shaped leaves have spines along the stem. If desired, remove fronds only after they have turned brown. Remove flower stalks before seeds set to prevent reseeding in the landscape.Washingtonia robusta

 

Width Range 10–15 Feet
Height Range 60–100 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 20 °F
Native Location Baja California and northern Mexico (Sonoran Desert)
Canopy Value 133 ft²
Design Style Pool Friendly, Thorns/Spines
Flower Color White
Flower Season Summer
Fruit Color Brown, Black
Fruit Season Autumn
General Foliage Color Green
Growth Rate Fast
Maintenance Level Medium
PH Preference Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Sand, Clay, Loam, Rocky, Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full
Sunset Zones 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
USDA Hardiness Zone 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
Water Requirement Medium

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Pindo Palm, Jelly Palm

Palm Tree

Has attractive arching, feathery, gray-green leaves. Produces a large quantity of messy fruit. Remove flower stalks to avoid cleanup. Fruit is edible and is used to make jelly in the deep south. Can be grown in containers. Regular watering and feeding will produce a faster growing, more attractive palm.Butia capitata

 

Width Range 14–16 Feet
Height Range 18–20 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 15 °F
Native Location South America
[Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay]
Canopy Value 133 ft²
Design Style Thorns/Spines
Flower Color Purple, Pink
Flower Season Spring
Fruit Color Orange, Yellow, Red
Fruit Season Summer
General Foliage Color Grey, Green
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Low
PH Preference Neutral, Not Particular
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Sand, Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun
Sunset Zones 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1, H2
USDA Hardiness Zone 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
Water Requirement High, Medium

Queen Palm

Avoid alkaline soils because of severe iron chlorosis. A regular nutritional program needs to include the supplemental micronutrients and especially manganese. Slow to recover from cold damage. Prefers humid conditions.Syagrus romanzoffieanum

 

Width Range 10–15 Feet
Height Range 30–50 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 25 °F
Native Location South Brazil to Argentina
Canopy Value 59 ft²
Design Style Child Friendly, Pool Friendly, Patio Plant
Flower Color Yellow
Flower Season Summer
Fruit Color Orange
Fruit Season Spring
General Foliage Color Green
Growth Rate Medium
Maintenance Level Medium, Low
PH Preference Acidic, Neutral
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Sand, Loam, Well Drained
Sun Exposure Full, Part Sun
Sunset Zones 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1, H2
USDA Hardiness Zone 9a, 9b
Water Requirement High, Medium

Windmill Palm, Hemp Palm, Chusan Palm

Palm Tree

Leaf stems are finely toothed. Do not skin trunk. Protect from heavy winds to avoid frond damage.Trachycarpus fortunei

 

Width Range 8–10 Feet
Height Range 20–40 Feet
Hardiness Cold Tolerance 10 °F
Native Location East China, Northern Burma and Kyushu Island of Japan
Canopy Value 59 ft²
Design Style Child Friendly, Pool Friendly, Patio Plant
General Foliage Color Green
Growth Rate Slow
Maintenance Level Low
PH Preference Acidic, Neutral
Plant Type Palm
Seasonal Habit Evergreen
Soil Preference Sand, Clay, Loam, Rocky, Well Drained
Sun Exposure Part Sun, Morning Sun
Sunset Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
USDA Hardiness Zone 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
Water Requirement Medium

 

Sago Palm information. (actually cycad) very sensitive at time the frawns will completely die off to protect itself. This is a normal occurance. They will usually grow back in spring.

The Sago Palm has become a very popular landscape item and is the most common cycad used in landscape today. But most people don’t realize that it is not a palm at all. Rather this plant is a Cycad, a totally different type of plant. There are over 200 different types of cycads. Cycads are a group of plants that are very primitive in their origins. Fossils have been found on almost every continent on the planet. It is often stated that cycads have evolved little since the days of the dinosaurs. There are species that have gone extinct, while there are others that seemed to show little evolution over millions of years. Therefore as a group, cycads are often referred to as “living fossils”. The scientific name for the Sago Palm is Cycas revoluta. Cycas refers to the genus, the genus refers to a particular group of similar plants in the Cycad family and revoluta further describes the exact species of the group Cycas. The latter was given to this species because of the revolute (to curl back) nature of the leaflets; the edges roll under the leaflet. Many people misspell the name of this cycad as Cycas revoluta or Cica revoluta. The genus is “Cycas“.

 

The natural course of leaves on plants, including palms and cycads, is first green, then turning yellow, and finally brown and dry. The yellow stage is where the frond is losing its chlorophyll as it is being re-absorbed into the plant. The final brown stage is the completion of the nutrients re-absorption process. If you cut off sago fronds too soon, you are actually depriving your sago palm of its natural technique to conserve nutrients. Best is to wait until a frond is totally brown. The exception to not being worried about yellow or brown fronds on your sago palm is if they are occurring in the center “new growth” area. If new fronds soon turn yellow and head for brown, you have a nutrition problem. You are not feeding properly. Sometimes a sago may take a year or two or more to develop the “quick yellowing” symptom. Don’t let that fool you. Food is the answer Once your sago palm is well established in its new location usually after one full calendar year it will start to thrive. Sago palms are fairly hardy plants. If the leaves do totally turn brown, trim them off……and wait. You’ll probably get a new batch of leaves next spring.

One rare issue to look for is on the underside of the foliage look for small white specks. A major problem of sagos is the invasive Asiatic Cycad Scale. They can cover the undersides in a few moths sucking the life out of the plant. For treatment, if you find this pest, is to spray the undersides with Organocide after it cools down to day time temperatures in the low 80’s. Or you could try using a systemic, such as Acephate (Ortho Systemic Spray) or Bayer Systemic Rose & Flower Care which has Disyston.

 

Date Palm, True Date Palm, Edible Date

Phoenix dactylifera

Large slow growing palm with feather-shaped fronds. May form multiple trucks when young, but most often seen in single trunk form. The fronds are gray-green to blue-green with sharp spines at the base. Both male and female plants produce brush-like stalks of white to cream flowers. Females produce orange-brown fruits. Dates can be messy but are a food source for birds. This species of date palm is the source of commercially sold dates. Only remove fronds that hang below three o’clock and nine o’clock. Best planted in spring or summer. Susceptible to bud rot and heart rot. Can sustain cold damage during the harsher winters and is slow to recover. Spray irrigation damages the trunk.